"The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera." - Dorothea Lange

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

this is one of...

the most gorgeous photographs i've seen in a long time. it's called "fence post, allensworth, california." matt black is the photographer - it's from his series entitled "the geography of poverty." you can see more of his remarkable work here.





Sunday, September 14, 2014

yes i do senior pictures

And yes, I'd like to do yours or that of someone you know. Doing commissioned portrait work is how I underwrite my personal photographic projects.

Here are three I've done recently. We had a lot of fun on these shoots; I'm ready to do more!











Tuesday, September 09, 2014

clara

My 19-month-old granddaughter Clara is soulful, playful, funny, curious, affectionate, independent, talkative, observant and very sweet. Also whip smart. Grandparents get to say these things about their grandkids, you know.





























Monday, September 08, 2014

grandkids

Henry just celebrated his 4th birthday, and I was very happy to be in attendance at the party. French silk pie for all!

Here is the birthday boy and his little sister, too.







Friday, September 05, 2014

classic photos

My daughter recently asked me to go through old family photos and make some copies for her to hang in her home.

My absolute favorites are from husband Eddie's Bar Mitzvah album. The pictures were taken by Bernard H. Winer (who, according to a quick Google search, died in 1999). These photos are classic early 60's party pics. I'm guessing Mr. Winer used a medium format camera with a big flash. He had a shot list that included all the basics: the candle lighting ceremony, the limbo, the dance with mom, the tie adjustment in the mirror. These photos are gorgeous - 8 "x 10" prints made on beautiful warm tone black and white paper. They've held up exquisitely over the years. Mr. Winer, I wish I could interview you. Bravo and thanks.

Enjoy some of my favorites for yourself!



















Thursday, September 04, 2014

miah



My friend Sheri recently returned from Uganda, and she brought home quite a gift.

Her name is Miah, and I had the great pleasure of meeting her yesterday.

Sheri and her husband, Jeremiah, left Kansas City for Uganda to finalize the adoption and bring home their little bundle just over four months ago. No one could have predicted the twists, turns, triumphs, disappointments, trials, tribulations, challenges, frustrations and ultimate joy they have experienced.  I hope they'll write a book about the Ugandan adoption process one of these days. For starters, they expected to be in Uganda 6 weeks at the most. It took 16 before they were allowed to bring Miah home.

Miah was in pretty bad shape when Sheri and Jeremiah first met her. She was sickly and couldn't walk. Now she runs all over the place and, as you can see she in these portraits I made at Loose Park, she is happy and healthy.

Welcome, Miah!





















Wednesday, September 03, 2014

dita pepe

“Who do you want to be? Or, more accurately, who could you have been? Czech photographer Dita Pepe takes these musings quite literally, re-imaging her life in a hundred different scenarios in her series Self Portraits with Men. Pepe’s photographs are disarming in their nonchalant subtly, the artist possessing an uncanny ability to become a seamless member of each family.
Initially posing with men she knew, Pepe eventually began approaching strangers as potential partners, sometimes including her own daughter in the mix. The portraits manage to transcend age, class and culture. Despite the often immediately recognizable archetypes present, Pepe inhabits each one fully. As single photographs, you cannot spot the stranger.
Though obviously comparable to the work of Cindy Sherman, Pepe’s chameleon talents focus more on how relationships can utterly transform an individual than embodying specific female identities. Questions of origin, influence and choice all come into play, the ‘what-if’ manifesting in a sometimes comical, sometimes surreal interpretation of different paths we all could have taken." - Feature Shoot